Assef The Kite Runner Essay Conclusion

The Kite Runner Essay

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The Kite Runner

Reading for leisure provides valuable insight into the author’s imagination or prior experience giving the reader a different perspective on a certain topic or culture. In Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner, we are introduced into a world of privilege in Afghanistan for the main character, Amir, combated with his best friend and half brother Hassan, their lowly Hazara servant. The two boys were raised together but being a Hazara is seen as an inferior race to many of the other more privileged Afghan boys, in particular a vile aggressive boy named Assef. The novel gets its name from a leisure activity known as kite fighting in Afghanistan in which Amir takes part as the main fighter while Hassan is his kite runner. Amir…show more content…

Amir discovers that Hassan is actually his half brother and in an attempt to relieve the guilt he still feels for not helping Hassan on that sad day, he agrees to help Hassan’s son Sohrab despite the successful life he leads in America. When he gets to Afghanistan, Amir is forced to meet with Assef who is a leader of the Taliban and who has Sohrab under his control. A presumed fight to the death ensues where Amir is nearly beaten to death before Sohrab shoots him in the eye with his slingshot. The two are able to retreat back to America where Amir symbolically teaches the quiet Sohrab to fly kites which provides a slight glimpse of hope for the future of everyone still alive. The Kite Runner is a perfect example of how leisure reading can give valuable insight into other cultures while enjoying the stories involved. The first half of the book gives a glimpse of how some cultures contain much more rigid class stratification based on race and the status one is born into. Hassan is born a Hazara servant and even though he is Amir’s best friends and unknown to them half brother, he still does all the things a servant is supposed to do such as cleaning and cooking while remaining a loyal friend to Amir. We see that in their culture, it is not appropriate for people of Amir’s status to associate so close

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Throughout the novel, several characters act immorally and selfishly and are forced to make sacrifices in order to atone for their sins, while others characters are pure of heart and selflessly make sacrifices to benefit others.For example, Baba is ashamed of hiding his relationship with his son Hassan throughout the novel, but Baba sacrifices his established lifestyle to move to America so Amir can prosper and have a future. Later on in the novel,...

Throughout the novel, several characters act immorally and selfishly and are forced to make sacrifices in order to atone for their sins, while others characters are pure of heart and selflessly make sacrifices to benefit others. For example, Baba is ashamed of hiding his relationship with his son Hassan throughout the novel, but Baba sacrifices his established lifestyle to move to America so Amir can prosper and have a future. Later on in the novel, Amir sacrifices his well-being to save Sohrab from Assef in Afghanistan in order to redeem himself. Characters like Ali, Hassan, and Sohrab make extraordinary sacrifices in order to prove their loyalty which depicts their morally upright nature. Hassan sacrifices his well-being by protecting Amir from Assef at the beginning of the novel. Hassan also takes the blame for stealing Amir's gifts so that Amir would not get into trouble. Ali makes a personal sacrifice by leaving Baba's home because of Hassan's situation, and Sohrab sacrifices his life when he uses his slingshot to shoot Assef's eye out. In each instance, various characters benefit greatly from other's sacrifices. Although sacrifice requires someone to give something up, Hosseini depicts the significant benefits of acting selflessly and sacrificing for others.

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