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Unformatted text preview: Your UNIXYLinux: The Ultimate Guide 3.16 Assuming that bar is a directory, explain what the command rm ~r‘f bar does. How is the command different from rmdi r bar? 3.1? How do you print the file /etc/passwd on the printer named laser on SystemV (i) to generate three copies, (ii) and know that the file has been printed? 3.18 How will you find out the ASCII octal values of the numerals and letters? 3.19 Run the we command with two or more filenarnes as arguments. What do you see? 3.20 How can you abort an editing session with pi on without saving the changes? 3.21 How can-you join multiple lines in pi co into a single line without using cutwandw paste. operations? 3.1 Describe the contents of a directory, explaining the mechanism by winch Its entries are updated by cp, mv, and tin. Why is the size of a directory usually small? 3.2 1 How does the device file help in accessing the device? 3.3 Which of these connnands will'work? Explain with reasons: ('1) mkdi r a/b/c, (ii) mkdir a a/b, (iii) filld‘ll" a/b/c, (iv) undir ' a a/b, (v) mkdi r /bin/foo. 3.4 The command rmdi r crprogs failed. State three possible reasons. 3.5 Using echo, try creating a file containing (i) one, (ii) two, and (iii) three dots. What do you conclude? 3.6 The command rmdi r bar fails with the message that the directory is not empty. , On running 15 bar, no files are displayed. Why did the rmdir command fail? 1/ 3.7 How does. the command mv barl barZ behave, where both barl and barZ are directories, when (i) bar2 exists, (ii) barZ doesn’t exist? ' .8 Explain the difference betWeen the commands cd ~char1i e and Cd -/ char] ie. Is it possible for both commands to work? 3.9 charlie uses [usr/c'narl i e as his home directory, and many of his scripts refer to the pathname / usr/char‘l ie/html . Later, the home directory is changed to / home / charl i e, thus breaking all his scripts. How could charlie have avoided this problem? 3.10 Why do we sometimes run a command like this_. /update.sh instead of update.sh? 3.11 What is the sort order prescribed by the ASCII collating sequence? 3.12. The commands l 5 bar and 1' s -d bar display the Same outputr—the string bar. This can happen in two ways. Explain. I 3.13 Assuming that you are positioned in the directory / home / romeo, what are , these commands presumed to do, and explain whether they will work at all: ('1) cd ../. .. (a) mkdir ../hin,(iii)rrnd1r (iv) ls '. .. V 3.14 Explain what the following commands do: (i) cd, (i) Cd $HOME, (iii) Cd ~. is" 13.15 The command cp hosts backup] hosts .bak didn’t work eVen though all files exist. Name three possible reasons. 3.16 You have a directory structure $HOME/ a/ a/b/c where the first a' is empty. How do you remove it and move the loWer directories up? 3.1? Explain what the following commands do: (i) rm *, (ii) rm —1' *, (iii) rm -rf *. Chapter 3: The File System 91 l/d.18 3.19 3.20 What is the significance of these commands? (i) mv $HOME/ include ., (ii) cp —r barl bar2, (iii) mv * ../b1‘ u. Will the command cp foo bar Work if (i) foo is an ordinary file and bar is a directory, (ii) both foo and bar are directories? ‘ Explain the significance of the repeat factor used in more. How do you search for the pattern include in a file and repeat the search? What is the difference betWe'en this repeat command and the dot command? Look up the man page for the fi Te command, and then use it on all files in the /dev directory. Can you group these files into two categories? How do DOS and UNIX text files differ? Name the utilities that convert files between these two formats. Run the script command, and then issue a few commands before you run exit. What do you see when you run cat —v typescript? Run the tty command, and note the device name of your terminal. Now use this device name (say, /dev/pts/6) in the command cp [etc/passwd ldev/pts/fi. What do you observe? How do you use tar to add two files, foo.htmi and bar. html, to an archive, archive. tar, and then compress the archive? How will you reverse the entire process and extract the files in their original uncompressed form? Name three advantages zip has over gzi [3. How do you send a complete directory structure to someone by email using (i) tar, (ii) 21 :3? How does the recipient handle it? Which method is superior and why? Does gzip help in any way? What is meant by recursive behavior of a command? Name four commands, along with a suitable example of each, that can operate recursively. There are shortcuts available for many p'ico commands that use the function keys. Use the help screen to find out the function keys that cut and paste tent. Use the pi co help screen to find out the key sequence that places the contents of another file in the file being edited. - Chapter 4: File Attributes 119 4.6 You removed the write permission of a file from. group and others, and yet they could delete your file. How could that happen? 4.7 Try creating a directory in the system directories /bin and /tmp, and explain your observations. ' 4.8 Copy a file with permissions 444. Copy it again and explain your observations. 4.9 How do you ensure that all ordinary files created byyou have r'w—rw—-—- as the ' - default permissions? _ 4.10 How do you display the inode number of a file? 4.11 What does the inode store? Which important file attribute is not maintained in the inode? Where is it stored then? 4.12 What do you mean by saying that a file has three links? 4.13 How do you remove (i) a hard link, (ii) a symbolic link pointing to a directory? 4.14 How do you link all C source files in the current directory and place the links in another directory, bar? 4.15 A symbolic link has the same mode number as the file it is linked to. True or false? 7 4.16 How do you link fool to i002 using (i) a hard link, (ii) a symbolic link? If you delete fool, does it make any difference? 4.17 Copy the tile /etc /pa.s swd to your current directory and then observe the listing of the copy. Which attributes have changed? 4.18 Where are the U11) and GID of a file stored? 4.19 I How is chown different from chgrp on a BSD—based system when it comes to renouncing ownership? 4.20 Explain with reference to the dot and * what the following commands do: (i) chown -R project . ,(ii) chgrp -R proj ect * . 4.21 When you invoke ls —l foo the access time of foo changes. True or false? 4.22 View the access time of a file with is —l it fun before appending the date com- mand output to it using date >> foo. Observe the access time again. What do you see? _ 4.23 Devise a fi rid command to locate in /dccs and /usr/docs all filenames that (i) begin with. 2, {ii} have the extension .html or .java. E X E E i l S E g 4.1 A file in. a file system with a block size of l024 bytes contains 1026 bytes. How many bytes of disk space does it occupy? _ 4.2 - Does the owner always belong to the same group as the group owner of a file? 4.3 Explain the significance of the foliowing commands: {i} ls —l d ., {ii} is —l . . . 4.4 Create a file foo. HOW do you assign all permissions to the owner and remove alE permissions from others using (1') relative assignment and (ii) absolute assign- ment? Do you need to make any assumptions about foojs default permissions? 4.5 From the security viewpoint, explain the consequences of creating a tile with permissions (i) 000, (ii) 777. 120 4.6 4.7 4.8 4.9 4.10 4.11 4.12 4.13 4.14 4.15 4.16 4.17 4.18 4.19 4.20 4.21 4.22 4.23 4.24 Your UNMinux: The Ultimate Guide_-_. Examine the output of the following two commands on a BSD—based system Explain whether ro'rneo can (i) edit, (ii) delete, (iii) change permissions -' (iv) change ownership of foo: $who ami ; ls —1 foo .1 $011160 —r——rw———— 1 sumit romeo 78 Jan 27 16:57 1too Assuming that a file’s current permissions are rw-r — xr— —, specify the chmod expression required to change them to (i) rwxrwmwx, (ii) r»— r—- -— , (iii) —-—r~-‘r‘—— , (iv) ——————— ——, using both relative and absolute methods of assigning permissions. Use chmod «w . and then try to create and remove a file in the current directory. Can you do that? Is the command the same as chmod aww foo? You tried to copy a file foo from another user’s directory, but you got the error message cannot create ti le foo. You have write permission in your own directory. What could be the reason, and how do you copy the file? What do you do to ensure that 110 one is able see the names of the files you have? The command cd bar failed where bar is a directory. How can that happen? If a file has the permissions 000, you may or may not be able to delete the file. Explain how both situations can happen. Does the execute permission have any role to play here? If the owner doesn’t have write permission on a file but her group has, can she (i) edit it, (ii) delete it? - If umask shows the value (i) 000, (ii) 002, what implications do they have from 3 the security viewpoint? The UNIX file system has many root directories even though it actually show one. True or false? What change takes place in the inode and directory when a filename is connected 3 by a hard link? If 15 -'h' shows two filenaines with the same inode number, what does thai indicate? What happens when you invoke the command in foo bar if (i) bar doesu’ exist, (ii) bar exists as an ordinary file, (iii) bar exists as a directory? How can you make out whether two files are copies or links? Explain two application areas of hard links. What are the two main disadvantages- of the hard link? You have a number of programs in $HOME/pr‘ogs which are called by other programs.~ You have now decided to move these programs to $HOME/i nternet/pr‘ogs. How' can you ensure that users don’t notice this change? Explain the significance of fast symbolic links and dangling symbolic links. Explain how is obtains the (i) filenaine, (ii) name of owner, (iii) name of group owner when dispiaying the listing. How will you determine whether your system uses. the BSD or AT&T version of charm and chgrp? Chapter 4: File Attributes 4.25 4.26 4.27 4 121 The owner can change all attributes of a file on a BSD~based system. Explain whether the statement is true or false. Is there any attribute that can be changed only by the superuser? What are the three time stamps maintained in the inode, and how do you display two of them for the file foo? HOW can you find out whether a program has been executed today? Explain the—difference between (i) is —l and is -l t, (ii) i s —l u and l s -i ut. Use f i nd to locate from your home directory tree all (i) files with the extension . html or . HTML, (ii) files having the inode number 907.6, (iii) directories having permissions 666, (iv) files modified yesterday. Will any of these commands fail? Use fi nd to (i) move all files modified within the last 24 hours to’ the posix directory under your parent directory, (ii) locate all files named a .out or core in your home directory tree and remove them interactively, (iii) locate the file logi‘n .sql in the loracl 9 directory tree,-and then copy it to your own direc- tory, (iv) change all directory permissions to 755 and all file permissions to 644 in your home directory tree. ...
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Units of study

Engineering and Information Technology Undergraduate

Complete unit of study descriptions giving details of assessment, learning outcomes, graduate attribute mappings and semester schedule are published on the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies course information web site.

http://cusp.sydney.edu.au/engineering

Engineering and Information Technologies undergraduate units of study

Complete unit of study descriptions giving details of assessment, learning outcomes, graduate attribute mappings and semester schedule are published on the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies course information web site : http://cusp.sydney.edu.au/engineering/

School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering

AERO1400 Intro to Aircraft Construction & Design


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and 3 hours of workshop sessions per week Assumed knowledge: Some basic skills with engineering workshop hand tools is desireable Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

The study towards BE(Aeronautical) involves learning about the Design, Analysis, Flight, and Operation of Aircraft and other Flight Platforms. This unit facilitates the training towards becoming professional aeronautical engineers through a globally-unique experiential-learning opportunity to provide a strong background familiarity with aircraft hardware. This unit is designed to educate and facilitate the learning of aircraft design, basic aircraft construction techniques, the operation of light aircraft and the registration and regulations relating to light aircraft. In addition to hands-on skills on the construction phase, this unit facilitates learning in motivations for unique aircraft design, aircraft aerodynamics, flight mechanics, structural aspects and other design-related issues. Teamwork plays a very important role in this unit; the ability to work with peers and supervising staff is an invaluable skill sought after by employers of engineers. Throughout the semester, students will be actively participating in the construction of a light aircraft. The aircraft is to be constructed under current Australian Civil Aviation Regulations so that students will gain an insight into all aspects of the process. By being a part of the construction team, students will also experience the organisational requirements necessary to successfully complete a complex engineering project. The aircraft construction workshop component is complemented with lectures, homework, research and assignments to further enhance the learning experience on aircraft. The final outcome will be that students gain a good foundation of: aircraft design and analyses methods; innovative methods of construction; techniques for selecting, sizing and stressing components; regulatory requirements for certification; off-design requirements; construction tolerances; and team-work requirements in undertaking complex engineering projects.

AERO1560 Introduction to Aerospace Engineering


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hours of lectures, 2 hours of tutorials and 3 hours of workshop practice per week Prohibitions: MECH1560, MTRX1701, ENGG1800 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This Unit introduces students to the role of professional aerospace engineers, along with the development of fundamental engineering knowledge and skills for aerospace vehicle design, analysis performance and operation. Students will learn through experience, to develop professional skills in research, interpretation, communication, and presentation of information relating to aerospace engineering. Expected learning includes: introduction to lateral thinking concepts; glossary of aerospace vehicle components and terminology; an introduction to the multiple disciplines related to aerospace engineering, such as aerodynamics, aircraft and spacecraft performance, mechanics of flight, aerospace structures, materials and propulsion systems; how the various disciplines are integrated into the design and development of flight platform systems; the operating characteristics of modern flight vehicles, their uses and limitations; modern developments and future trends in aerospace; the limitations of the aerospace environment; teamwork; and resource management. Significantly, professional enhancement is introduced through the development of basic hands-on workshop skills. These practical skills enable students to have a better appreciation of the hardware that they are expected to apply their engineering knowledge to, during their aerospace engineering profession. Experiential learning is facilitated working with machine tools and hand tools in a supervised workshop environment, to develop fundamentals of practical aerospace vehicle component manufacture, construction, servicing and repair.

AERO2703 Aerospace Technology 1


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week. Prerequisites: AERO1560 Assumed knowledge: ENGG1801 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to develop in students an understanding of the background technologies and processes that are involved in the design, construction and operation of Aerospace vehicles. It will cover the general areas of aircraft performance, aircraft and laboratory instrumentation and associated programming techniques.

AERO2705 Space Engineering 1


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week Prerequisites: AERO1560 (or MECH1560 or MTRX1701), MATH1001, MATH1002, MATH1003) Assumed knowledge: ENGG1801 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to introduce students to the terminology, technology and current practice in the field of Space Engineering. Course content will include a variety of topics in the area of orbital mechanics, satellite systems and launch requirements. Case studies of current systems will be the focus of this unit.

AERO2711 Space Engineering Project 1


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours of project meeting per week. Prerequisites: Completed the junior year of Aero(Space), Mechanical(Space) or Mechatronics(Space) Engineering. An average mark of > 75% is required as well as departmental permission from the Space Engineering Coordinator. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This unit of study aims to develop deeper practical knowledge in the area of Space systems engineering. Students who take this subject would be interested in developing design skills by working on the sub-system of a real satellite or launch vehicle.

AERO3260 Aerodynamics 1


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week. Associated laboratory sessions during semester. Prerequisites: AMME2200 and (MATH2061 or MATH2067 or MATH2961) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This UoS should prepare students to be able to undertake aerodynamic performance calculations for industry design situations. The unit aims to develop a knowledge and appreciation of the complex behaviour of airflow in the case of two dimensional aerofoil sections and three dimensional wings; To encourage hands-on experimentation with wind-tunnel tests to allow an understanding of these concepts and their range of applicability. To understand the limitations of linearised theory and the effects of unsteady flow.

AERO3261 Propulsion


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week Prerequisites: AMME2200 Assumed knowledge: Good knowledge of fluid dynamics and thermodynamics Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This UoS teaches the students the techniques used to propel aircraft and rockets. The students will learn to analyse various propulsion systems in use propellers, gas turbines, rocket motors etc. The topics covered include: Propulsion unit requirements for subsonic and supersonic flight; thrust components, efficiencies, additive drag of intakes. Piston engine components and operation. Propeller theory. Operation, components and cycle analysis of gas turbine engines; turbojets; turbofans; turboprops; ramjets. Components: compressor; fan; burner; turbine; nozzle. Efficiency of components; off-design considerations. Operation, components and thermodynamics of rocket motors. Dynamics of rocket flight; orbital velocity; staging. Future directions; minimisation of noise and pollution; sub-orbital propulsion systems; scram-jets; hybrid engines.

AERO3360 Aerospace Structures 1


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week Prerequisites: AMME2301 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to develop a student's understanding of the theoretical basis of advanced aerospace structural analysis; and introduce students to the solution of real-world aircraft structural problems. This UoS will develop the following attributes: An understanding of the derivation of the fundamental equations of elasticity and their application in certain analytical problems; An understanding of plate theory and the ability to use this to obtain analytical solutions for plate bending and buckling problems; An understanding of energy-method to develop a deeper appreciation for the complexities of designing solution techniques for structural problems; An understanding of the basic principals behind stressed-skin aircraft construction and the practical analysis of typical aircraft components, including the limitations of such techniques. At the end of this unit students will have an understanding of: 2-D and 3-D elasticity: general equations and solution techniques; Energy methods in structural analysis, including the principles of virtual work and total potential and complimentary energies; Fundamental theory of plates, including in-plane and bending loads as well as buckling and shear instabilities; Solution techniques for plate problems including: Navier solutions for rectangular plates; Combined bending and in-plane loading problems; Energy methods for plate-bending; and Plate buckling for compression and shear loadings; Bending of beams with unsymmetrical cross-sections; Basic principals and theory of stressed-skin structural analysis; Determination of direct stresses and shear flows in arbitrary thin-walled beams under arbitrary loading conditions including: Unsymmetrical sections, Open and closed sections, Single and multi-cell closed sections, Tapered sections, Continuous and idealized sections; The analysis of common aircraft components including fuselages, wings, skin-panels, stringers, ribs, frames and cut-outs; The effects of end constraints and shear-lag on the solutions developed as well as an overall appreciation of the limitations of the solution methods presented

AERO3460 Aerospace Design 1


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and 3 hours of in-class project work per week. Prerequisites: AMME2301 and MECH2400 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to introduce students to the theory and practice of aircraft structural component design. In doing so it will emphasize all the considerations, trade-offs and decisions inherent in this process and thus enable students to gain an understanding of why aircraft structures are designed in the way they are with respect to structural, manufacturing and cost considerations. At the end of this unit students will be able to understand the design process, especially as it applies to aircraft structural component design; Have a familiarity with some of the practice of aircraft component structural design; An increasing familiarity with typical aircraft structural paradigms and how they work and can be analysed along with the primary failure modes that need to be considered; An understanding of the importance of different failure modes for different components and how these relate to load-conditions and understanding of some off the legal and ethical requirements of aircraft design engineers; A basic understanding of the regulatory framework in which aircraft design is conducted.

AERO3465 Aerospace Technology 2


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4 hours of lecture/project work session per week. 2 hours of tutorials per week. Prerequisites: AMME2301 and MECH2400 Assumed knowledge: AERO1400; AMME2302 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to develop an understanding of the aerospace industry procedures for design, analysis, and testing of aircraft and aerospace vehicle components. It provides a Design-Build-Test experience by putting into practice, learning outcomes from this and other previously completed UoS, through working on a small structure which is representative of a typical light metal aircraft. Students will be introduced to typical metallic and composite materials and structures for aerospace vehicles. The unit also provides an introduction to fatigue and damaged tolerance analysis of metallic aircraft structures. Experiential learning opportunities are provided to acquire skills and knowledge in structural design, analyses, testing methods, procedures, techniques, and equipment. On satisfactory completion of this unit students will have gained practical skills relevant to working on typical modern aircraft and aerospace vehicle components. They will learn from methods, techniques, and experiences from the modern aerospace industry. Experiential learning is enhanced through verifying analyses with actual testing of fabricated component, and the experience of a full design-build-test cycle of a typical aerospace structural component. Subject areas covered will include design methods, internal loads calculations, stress analysis, design for manufacture, joints and fasteners, test procedures, fatigue and damage tolerance, composites, and the art of design.

AERO3560 Flight Mechanics 1


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week. 2 hours of laboratory work per semester. Prerequisites: AMME2500 and (MATH2061 or MATH2067 or MATH2965) Corequisites: AMME3500 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to develop an understanding of aircraft longitudinal equilibrium, static stability, dynamic stability and response. Students will develop an understanding of the importance and significance of flight stability, will gain skills in dynamic system analysis and will learn mathematical tools used for prediction of aircraft flight behaviour. Students will gain skills in problem solving in the area of flight vehicle motion, and learn the fundamentals of flight simulation. At the end of this unit students will be able to understand: aircraft flight conditions and equilibrium; the effects of aerodynamic and propulsive controls on equilibrium conditions; the significance of flight stability and its impact of aircraft operations and pilot workload; the meaning of aerodynamic stability derivatives and their sources; the effects of aerodynamic derivatives on flight stability; the impact of flight stability and trim on all atmospheric flight vehicles. Students will also be able to model aircraft flight characteristics using computational techniques and analyse the aircraft equations of rigid-body motion and to extract stability characteristics. Course content will include static longitudinal aircraft stability: origin of symmetric forces and moments; static and manoeuvring longitudinal stability, equilibrium and control of rigid aircraft; aerodynamic load effects of wings, stabilisers, fuselages and power plants; trailing edge aerodynamic controls; trimmed equilibrium condition; static margin; effect on static stability of free and reversible controls.

AERO3660 Aerospace Management


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to develop knowledge and understanding of the current state of aerospace design, manufacturing, and operations in the Australian aviation industry. Students will gain skills in aerospace engineering management. On satisfactory completion of this unit, students will be able to apply risk management skills to a variety of industry situations and use appropriate methodology to manage these situations. Students will also become proficient in the use of Project Management tools and learn how to apply them to industry standard problems. Subject areas covered within the Unit of Study include principles and practice of aviation and airline management; discussion and analysis of airline operations; flight safety and airworthiness standards; risk and reliability management; and management in aerospace engineering design.

AERO3711 Space Engineering Project 2


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours of project meeting sessions per week. Prerequisites: AERO2711 Space Engineering Project 1; a WAM of > 75% is required as well as departmental permission from the Space Engineering Coordinator. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This unit of study is for those students who have completed Space Engineering Project 1, and who wish to extend their design into the prototype phase. Students who take this subject would be interested in manufacturing a sub-system for a real satellite or launch vehicle. This unit allows students to develop a deeper appreciation for the complexities of designing and building space sub-systems, and if completed successfully will allow the student to take further Space Engineering Projects towards the final development of a sub-system ready for launch.

AERO3760 Space Engineering 2


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and 2 hours of project work sessions per week. Prerequisites: AERO2705 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to provide students with a learning environment that promotes systems thinking and allows students to develop skills in systems analysis and design. In particular the UoS will focus on Aerospace systems, and students will develop both theoretical and practical skills in the area of systems engineering for this discipline. The primary objective is to develop fundamental systems engineering and systems thinking skills. At the end of this unit students will be able to: define the requirements process and be able to apply it to aerospace systems design.; conduct requirements analysis for an aerospace system and to drill down through requirements breakdown and the use of the V-diagram in this analysis; conduct functional and technical analysis and determine design drivers in a system; manage the use of a log book and its application in engineering design; develop technical skills in the design and development of satellite subsystems; conduct appropriate interaction processes between team members for the successful achievement of goals. Course content will include fundamentals of systems engineering; satellite subsystems; systems design.

AERO4206 Rotary Wing Aircraft


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and 1 hour of tutorials per semester. Prerequisites: AERO3260 and AERO3560 Assumed knowledge: Prior Learning : concepts from 3rd Year Aerodynamics and Flight Mechanics will be applied to Rotary Wing Vehicles in this unit. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to develop an understanding of the theory of flight, design and analysis of helicopters, auto-gyros and other rotary wing aircraft. Students will gain an appreciation of the extra difficulties involved when the vehicle flow is cyclic in nature. At the end of this unit students will be able to: Identify and predict the various flow states of a generic lift producing rotor; Use appropriate methods to determine the forces and torques associated with the rotor; Estimate values for typical stability derivatives for helicopters and be able to construct a simple set of stability analysis equations for the vehicle; become aware of the regulatory and liability requirements relating to all aspects of commercial helicopter operation and maintenance. Course content will include introduction to rotary wing aircraft; vertical flight performance; forward flight performance; blade motion and control; dynamics of rotors; rotor-craft stability; rotor blade design.

AERO4260 Aerodynamics 2


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week. Prerequisites: AMME2200 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to introduce students to: elementary and advanced topics in Gasdynamics (High Speed Flows). Course content will include review of Equations of Gasdynamics, One-Dimensional Gas Flow, Isentropic Flows, Normal Shock, Flow in a Converging and a Converging-Diverging Nozzle, Steady Two-dimensional Supersonic flow, Shock waves (Normal and Oblique), Method of Characteristics, Two-dimensional Supersonic Aerofoils, Introduction to Three-dimensional Effects, Unsteady Flows, Moving Shock, Shock Tube Flow and Transonic Flow and Compressible Boundary Layers. At the end of this unit the student will be able to calculate a high speed flow about an aerofoil and compressible flow through a duct of varying cross section and will have a good appreciation of Transonic and Hypersonic Flows.

AERO4360 Aerospace Structures 2


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week. Prerequisites: AERO3360 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to teach fundamentals of modern numerical and analytical techniques for evaluating stresses, strains, deformations and strengths of representative aerospace structures. In particular the focus is on developing an understanding of: Fundamental concepts and formulations of the finite element methods for basic structural analysis; Elements for typical aerospace structures, such as beams/frames, plates/shells, and their applications and limitations; Finite element techniques for various types of problems pertinent to aerospace structures; d)and, developing hands-on experience of using selected commercial finite element analysis program. At the end of this unit of study the following will have been covered: Introduction to Finite Element Method for modern structural and stress analysis; One-dimensional rod elements; Generalization of FEM for elasticity; Two- and three-dimensional trusses; FEA for beams and frames in 2D and 3D; Two-dimensional problems using constant strain triangular elements; The two-dimensional isoparametric elements; Plates and shells elements and their applications; FEA for axisymmetric shells and pressure vessels, shells of revolution; FEA for axisymmetric solids subjected to axi-symmetric loading; FEA for structural dynamics, eigenvalue analysis, modal response, transient response; Finite element analysis for stress stiffening and buckling of beams, plates and shells; Three-dimensional problems in stress analysis; Extensions to the element library, higher order elements, special elements; Constraints; FEA modeling strategy; FEA for heat conduction; FEA for non-linear material and geometric analysis.

AERO4460 Aerospace Design 2


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and 3 hours of project work in-class per week. Prerequisites: AERO3260, AERO3261, AERO3360 and AERO3460 Assumed knowledge: AERO1400, AERO2703 and AERO3465 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to develop an understanding of the application of design to the modern aerospace industry. Students will gain an overview of how to manage a design team and will also gain skills in carrying out detailed design problems. Course content will include: Design requirements; Sources of information for aircraft design; Configuration design: performance, weight and balance, propulsion; Aerodynamic design: lift, drag and control; Structural design: loads, materials; Philosophies of design and analysis; System design: requirements and specification; System design procedures; systems integration.

AERO4491 Advanced Aircraft Design


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hours of project work in-class per week. Prerequisites: MECH2400 and AERO3460 Assumed knowledge: AERO1400, AERO2703, AERO3260, AERO3261, AERO3360, AERO3465 and AERO3560 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to develop an understanding of the application of design to the modern aerospace context. Students will gain an overview of how to manage a project and its associated design team and will also gain skills in setting design specifications and carrying out detailed design analysis to meet some challenging requirement. Unit of Study content will include: Aircraft design methods; Methods of processing information for aircraft design: Detailed configuration design: performance, weight and balance, propulsion; Aerodynamic design: lift, drag and control; Advanced structural design, loads, materials; Weight estimation and fulfilling of relevant regulatory requirements; Advanced system design, modern aircraft requirements and specification; systems integration and validation; prototyping, benchmarking and testing.

AERO4560 Flight Mechanics 2


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and 3 hours of tutorials per week Prerequisites: AERO3560 and AMME3500 Assumed knowledge: AMME2500 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to develop an understanding of the application of flight mechanics principles to modern aircraft systems. Students will gain skills in problem solving in the areas of dynamic aircraft behaviour, aircraft sensitivity to wind gusts, control systems development and aircraft handling analysis. At the end of this unit students will be able to: Uunderstand the nature of an aircraft's response to control inputs and atmospheric disturbances, including the roles of the various modes of motion; Analyse an aircraft's response to control inputs in the frequency domain using Laplace Transforms and Transfer Function representations; Represent and model wind gust distributions using stochastic methods (Power Spectral Density); Analyse an aircraft's response to disturbances (wind gust inputs) by combining Transfer Function representations with gust PSD's; Uunderstand the principles of stability augmentation systems and autopilot control systems in aircraft operation, their functions and purposes; Understand basic feedback control systems and classical frequency domain loop analysis; Understand the characteristics of closed loop system responses; Understand the characteristics of PID, Lead, Lag and Lead-Lag compensators, and to be competent in designing suitable compensators using Bode and Root-locus design techniques; Design multi-loop control and guidance systems and understand the reasons for their structures.

AERO4591 Advanced Flight Mechanics


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week Prerequisites: AERO3560 and AMME3500 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This unit aims to develop an understanding of the development of modern flight control, guidance, and navigation systems. Students will gain skills in analysis, problem solving and systems design in the areas of aircraft dynamic system identification and control. At the end of this unit students will be able to: understand the principles of stability augmentation systems and autopilot control systems in aircraft operation, their functions and purposes; understand the characteristics of closed loop system responses; understand advanced feedback control systems and state-space design techniques; understand the concepts of parameter and state estimation; design observers in the state space and to implement a Kalman Filter; be comfortable with multi-loop control and guidance systems and the reasons for their structures; appreciate flight test principles and procedures and to be capable of implementing a flight test programme.

AERO4701 Space Engineering 3


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week Prerequisites: AERO3760 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This UoS aims to teach students the fundamental principles and methods of designing solutions to estimation problems in aerospace engineering applications. Students will apply learned techniques in estimation theory to solving a wide range of different problems in engineering such as satellite positioning systems, satellite attitude determination, satellite orbit determination and remote sensing. Students will learn to recognize and appreciate the coupling between the different elements within an estimation task, such as satellite remote sensing, from a systems-theoretic perspective. Students will also use this system knowledge and basic design principles to design and test a solution to a given estimation task, with a focus on aerospace applications (such as satellite remote sensing).

AERO4711 Space Engineering Project 3


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours of project meeting sessions per week. Prerequisites: AERO3711 Space Engineering Project 2; a WAM of > 75% is required as well as departmental permission from the Space Engineering Coordinator. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This unit of study is for those students who have completed Space Engineering Projects 2, and who wish to formalise their design into the launch phase. Students who take this subject would be interested in manufacturing the final sub-system for a real satellite or launch vehicle. This unit allows students to develop a deeper appreciation for the complexities of designing and building space sub-systems, and provide an opportunity for the actual launch of the sub-system. Launch of the sub-system will be dependent on the current opportunities existing with international collaborators.

AERO4712 Space Engineering Project 4


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours of project meeting sessions per week. Prerequisites: AERO4711 Space Engineering Project 3; a WAM of > 75% is required as well as departmental permission from the Space Engineering Coordinator. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This unit of study is for those students who have completed Space Engineering Projects 3, and who wish to finalise their design by developing the interfacing and insertion phases into Satellite or Launch Vehicle system. Students who take this subject would have completed the previous three Space Engineering Projects, and have been provided with the opportunity to place their system into an actual system. Launch of the sub-system will be dependent on the current opportunities existing with international collaborators.

AMME0011 International Exchange B


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Note: Department permission required for enrolment.

An exchange component unit for students going on an International Exchange Program.

AMME0012 International Exchange C


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Note: Department permission required for enrolment.

An exchange component unit for students going on an International Exchange Program

AMME0013 International Exchange D


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Note: Department permission required for enrolment.

An exchange component unit for students going on an International Exchange Program

AMME0014 International Exchange E


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Note: Department permission required for enrolment.

An exchange component unit for students going on an International Exchange Program.

AMME0015 International Exchange F


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Note: Department permission required for enrolment.

An exchange component unit for students going on an International Exchange Program

AMME0016 International Exchange G


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Note: Department permission required for enrolment.

An exchange component unit for students going on an International Exchange Program.

AMME0017 International Exchange H


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Note: Department permission required for enrolment.

An exchange component unit for students going on an International Exchange Program

AMME0018 International Exchange I


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Note: Department permission required for enrolment.

An exchange component unit for students going on an International Exchange Program

AMME1550 Dynamics 1


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and 3 hours of tutorials per week Assumed knowledge: HSC extension 1 maths Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to develop an understanding of the basic methods required to perform kinematics and dynamic analysis on particles. By the end of this unit of study students will be able to solve complicated kinematics and dynamics problems of particles in both 2 and 3 dimensions.

AMME2200 Thermodynamics and Fluids


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week Assumed knowledge: MATH1001; MATH1002; MATH1003 or advanced versions. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Students are expected to be familiar with basic, first year, integral calculus, differential calculus and linear algebra.

This unit aims to teach the basic laws of thermodynamics and the fundamentals of fluid statics and dynamics. At the end of this unit students will have: an understanding of the basic laws of thermodynamics and basic equations governing the statics and dynamics of fluids; the ability to analyze the thermodynamics of a simple open or closed engineering system; the ability to analyze and determine the forces governing static fluid; the ability to evaluate the relevant flow parameters for fluid flow in internal engineering systems such as pipes and pumps (velocities, losses, etc.) and external systems such as flow over wings and airfoils (lift and drag). Course content will include concepts of heat and work, properties of substances, first law of thermodynamics, control mass and control volume analysis, thermal efficiency, entropy, second law of thermodynamics, reversible and irreversible processes, isentropic efficiency, power and refrigeration cycles; basic concepts of pressure, force, acceleration, continuity, streamline and stream function, viscosity, non-dimensional parameters; Fluid statics: governing hydrostatic equations, buoyancy; Fluid dynamics: governing conservation equations; Potential flow, vorticity and circulation; Bernouilli and Euler equations; A brief introduction to flow measuring devices, pipe flow, flow over surfaces, lift and drag.

AMME2301 Mechanics of Solids


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week Prerequisites: (MATH1001 or MATH1901 or MATH1906), (MATH1002 or MATH1902), (MATH1003 or MATH1903 or MATH1907), ENGG1802 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Equilibrium of deformable structures; basic concept of deformation compatibility; stress and strain in bars, beams and their structures subjected to tension, compression, bending, torsion and combined loading; statically determinate and indeterminate structures; energy methods for bar and beam structures; simple buckling; simple vibration; deformation of simple frames and cell box beams; simple two-dimensional stress and Morh's circle; problem-based applications in aerospace, mechanical and biomedical engineering.

AMME2302 Materials 1


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours of lectures, 2 hours of tutorials per week. 3 hours of laboratory work per semester. Prohibitions: CIVL2110 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

AMME2302 is an introductory course in engineering materials. The unit aims to develop students' understanding of the structures, mechanical properties and manufacture of a range of engineering materials as well as how the mechanical properties relate to microstructure and forming and treatment methods. The unit has no prerequisite subject and is therefore intended for those with little or no previous background in engineering materials. However the unit does require students to take a significant degree of independent responsibility for developing their own background knowledge of materials and their properties. The electrical, magnetic, thermal and optical properties of materials are a critical need-to-know area where students are expected to do most of their learning by independent study.

AMME2500 Engineering Dynamics


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week. 6 hours of laboratory work per semester. Prerequisites: (MATH1001 or MATH1901 or MATH1906), (MATH1002 or MATH1902), (AMME1550 or PHYS1001 or PHYS1901 ) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit of study aims to teach: Dynamics of Rigid Bodies: Analysis of Planar mechanisms; Kinematics of rigid bodies; Kinetics of rigid bodies. Students will also develop their skills in: how to model and analyse dynamic systems and the application of theory to real systems through practical/laboratory sessions.
At the end of this unit students will have developed skills in modelling and analysing planar mechanisms and rigid body dynamic systems.
Course content will include planar mechanisms, linkages, mobility; instant centres of rotation, Kennedy's theorem; velocity and acceleration polygons; kinematics of rigid bodies, frames of reference, velocity and acceleration, rotating frame of reference, relative velocity and acceleration, gyroscopic acceleration; kinetics of rigid bodies, linear momentum and Euler's first law; angular momentum and Euler's second law; centre of mass; moments of inertia, parallel axis and parallel plane theorems, principal axes and principal moments of inertia, rotation about an axis; impulse and momentum; work and energy, kinetic and potential energies; applications to orbital and gyroscopic motion; introduction to Lagrangian methods.

AMME2700 Instrumentation


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hrs of lectures per week, 1hr of tutorials per week, 6hrs of laboratory per semester. Prerequisites: AERO1560 OR MECH1560 OR MTRX1701 OR ENGG1800 Assumed knowledge: ENGG1801 or INFO1103 Programming Skills, 1st Year maths skills, familiarity with fundamental Aerospace concepts. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to develop in students an understanding of the engineering measurements and instrumentation systems. The students will acquire an ability to make accurate and meaningful measurements. It will cover the general areas of electrical circuits and mechanical/electronic instrumentation for strain, force, pressure, moment, torque, displacement, velocity, acceleration, temperature and so on.

AMME3110 Project A


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: no formal classes Prohibitions: AMME4110 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Note: Departmental permission required for enrolment.

Supervised project on a relevant engineering discipline.

AMME3500 System Dynamics and Control


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and 3 hours of tutorials per week Prerequisites: AMME2500; (MATH2061 or MATH2961 or MATH2067) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit of study aims to allow students to develop an understanding of methods for modeling and controlling linear, time-invariant systems. Techniques examined will include the use of differential equations and frequency domain approaches to modeling of systems. This will allow students to examine the response of a system to changing inputs and to examine the influence of external stimuli such as disturbances on system behaviour. Students will also gain an understanding of how the responses of these mechanical systems can be altered to meet desired specifications and why this is important in many engineering problem domains.
The study of control systems engineering is of fundamental importance to most engineering disciplines, including Electrical, Mechanical, Mechatronic and Aerospace Engineering. Control systems are found in a broad range of applications within these disciplines, from aircraft and spacecraft to robots, automobiles, computers and process control systems. The concepts taught in this course introduce students to the mathematical foundations behind the modelling and control of linear, time-invariant dynamic systems.
In particular, topics addressed in this course will include:
1. Techniques for modelling mechanical systems and understanding their response to control inputs and disturbances. This will include the use of differential equations and frequency domain methods as well as tools such as Root Locus and Bode plots.
2. Representation of systems in a feedback control system as well as techniques for determining what desired system performance specifications are achievable, practical and important when the system is under control
3. Theoretical and practical techniques that help engineers in designing control systems, and an examination of which technique is best in solving a given problem.

AMME4010 Major Industrial Project


Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: no formal classes Prerequisites: (36 credits of 3rd year units of study) Prohibitions: AMME4111,AMME4112,AMME4121,AMME4122 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Note: Passed at least 144 credit points. Departmental permission required for enrolment

Students spend 6 months at an industrial placement working on a major engineering project relevant to their engineering stream. This is a 24 credit point unit, which may be undertaken as an alternative to ENGG4000 Practical Experience, AMME4111/4112 Honours Thesis A & B, MECH4601 Professional Engineering 2 and a recommended elective. This unit of study gives students experience in carrying out a major project within an industrial environment, and in preparing and presenting detailed technical reports (both oral and written) on their work. The project is carried out under joint University/industry supervision, with the student essentially being engaged fulltime on the project at the industrial site.

AMME4110 Project B


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prohibitions: AMME3110 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Note: Departmental permission required for enrolment.

Supervised project on a relevant engineering discipline.

AMME4111 Honours Thesis A


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time, Prerequisites: 36 credit points of senior units of study and 2nd/3rd year WAM of 65% or greater Corequisites: AMME4112 Prohibitions: AMME4121, AMME4122 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

The fourth year honours thesis aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering research skills. These skills include the capacity to define a research question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Honours thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Honours Thesis A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Thesis B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
It is not expected that a thesis at this level will represent a significant contribution to new knowledge; nor is it expected that theses will resolve great intellectual problems. The timeframe available for the thesis is simply too short to permit students to tackle complex or difficult problems. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion.

AMME4112 Honours Thesis B


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time, Prerequisites: AMME4111 Prohibitions: AMME4121, AMME4122 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

The fourth year honours thesis aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research or design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering skills in research or design. These skills include the capacity to define a research or design question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research or design in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Honours thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Honours Thesis A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Thesis B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research or major design project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
It is not expected that a thesis at this level will represent a significant contribution to new knowledge; nor is it expected that theses will resolve great intellectual problems. The time frame available for the thesis is simply too short to permit students to tackle complex or difficult problems. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research or design topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research or design skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion.

AMME4121 Engineering Project A


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 36 credit points of senior units of study. Corequisites: AMME4122 Prohibitions: AMME4111, AMME4112 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision

To complete the research requirement for their engineering degree, students now have a choice of either completing Honours Thesis A/B (AMME 4111/AMME4112) or Project A/B (AMME 4121/AMME4122). Project A/B is intended to be more practical in orientation while Thesis A/B demands extensive literature review and critical analysis of outcomes. Honours Thesis is a program for individuals whereas Projects can be done by groups or by an individual. Engineering Project A/B is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Engineering Project A covers first steps of project work, starting with development of project proposal. Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the project results. The fourth year engineering project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering design skills. These skills include the capacity to define a engineering design problem, showing how it relates to prior art, identifying appropriate tools and methods, carrying out a design in a systematic way and presenting outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured

AMME4122 Engineering Project B


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: AMME4121 Prohibitions: AMME4111, AMME4112 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision

To complete the research requirement for their engineering degree, students now have a choice of either completing Honours Thesis A/B (AMME 4111/AMME4112) or Project A/B (AMME 4121/AMME4122). Project A/B is intended to be more practical in orientation while Thesis A/B demands extensive literature review and critical analysis of outcomes. Honours Thesis is a program for individuals whereas Projects can be done by groups or by an individual. Engineering Project A/B is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Engineering Project A covers first steps of project work, starting with development of project proposal. Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the project results. The fourth year engineering project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering design skills. These skills include the capacity to define a engineering design problem, showing how it relates to prior art, identifying appropriate tools and methods, carrying out a design in a systematic way and presenting outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured

AMME4210 Computational Fluid Dynamics


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 hour of lectures, 1 hour of tutorial and 2 hours of computer lab work per week Prerequisites: MECH3261 or AERO3260 Assumed knowledge: Partial differental equations, finite difference methods, linear algebra, matrix methods, pressure, force, acceleration, continuity, streamline and streamfunction, viscosity, control parameters, non-dimensionalisation. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

The aim of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of the theoretical basis of computational fluid dynamics, the ability to write a simple Navier-Stokes solver and the skills to use a state of the art commercial computational fluid dynamics package. At the end of this unit students will have the ability to assess fluid mechanics problems commonly encountered in industrial and environmental settings, construct and apply computational models, determine critical control parameters and relate them to desired outcomes and write reports. Course content will include Navier-Stokes equations; finite difference methods; accuracy and stability for the advection and diffusion equations; direct and iterative solution techniques; solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations; turbulent flow; cartesian tensors; turbulence models.

AMME4241 Renewable Energy


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and 2 hour of tutorials per week Prerequisites: (MECH3260 and MECH3261) or (AERO3260 and AERO3261) Assumed knowledge: The students will require an understanding of the basic principles of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics and heat transfer, and the application of these principles to energy conversion systems. In particular, students should be able to analyse fluid flow in turbomachinery; perform first and second law thermodynamic analysis of energy conversion systems; and perform calculations of radiative, conductive and convective heat transfer Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to develop understanding of the engineering design and analysis of different devices and technologies for generating power from renewable sources including: solar, wind, wave, tidal, ocean thermal, geothermal, hydro-electric, and biofuels; to understand the environmental, operational and economic issues associated with each of these technologies. At the end of this unit students will be able to perform in depth technical analysis of different types of renewable energy generation devices using the principles of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics and heat transfer. Students will be able to describe the environmental, economic and operational issues associated with these devices.

AMME4500 Guidance, Navigation and Control


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week Prerequisites: AMME3500. Assumed knowledge: Students have an interest and a strong understanding of feedback control systems, specifically in the area of system modelling and control design in the frequency domain. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit introduces engineering design via optimization, i.e. finding the "best possible" solution to a particular problem. For example, an autonomous vehicle must find the fastest route between two locations over a road network; a biomedical sensing device must compute the most accurate estimate of important physiological parameters from noise-corrupted measurements; a feedback control system must stabilize and control a multivariable dynamical system (such as an aircraft) in an optimal fashion.
The student will learn how to formulate a design in terms of a "cost function", when it is possible to find the "best" design via minimization of this "cost", and how to do so. The course will introduce widely-used optimization frameworks including linear and quadratic programming (LP and QP), dynamic programming (DP), path planning with A*, state estimation via Kalman filters, and control via the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and Model Predictive Control (MPC). There will be constant emphasis on connections to real-world engineering problems in control, robotics, aerospace, biomedical engineering, and manufacturing.

AMME4660 Management, Employees and Industrial Rel


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5 hours of tutorial/work group sessions per week Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit aims to develop an understanding of industrial relations issues in Australia, Government regulations, awards and agreements, and how they relate to companies, management, employers, employees, and unions. Students will develop skills and understanding of Australian regulations and awards, negotiation of workplace agreements, enterprise bargaining agreements, and working with unions. The course will be viewed from the perspective of all players in the system so that a new graduate, who will at some time fit all categories, has an understanding of employer/employee relationships in the workforce. Guest lecturers will be invited from industry (management, unions, etc.) to present their experiences in industrial relations. Role playing will be used to simulate working environments to develop skill in handling grievances, resolving conflicts, and develop negotiating skills. By the end of this unit of study students will be better prepared to enter the workforce as both an employee and as a manager.

AMME4710 Computer Vision and Image Processing


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and 3 hours of laboratory work per week Assumed knowledge: MECH4720 or MECH4730 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This unit of study introduces students to vision sensors, computer vision analysis and digital image processing. This course will cover the following areas: fundamental principles of vision sensors such as physics laws, radiometry, CMOS/CDD imager architectures, colour reconstruction; the design of physics-based models for vision such as reflectance models, photometric invariants, radiometric calibration. This course will also present algorithms for video/image analysis, transmission and scene interpretation. Topics such as image enhancement, restoration, stereo correspondence, pattern recognition, object segmentation and motion analysis will be covered.

AMME4790 Introduction to Biomechatronics


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week Prerequisites: MTRX3700 or MECH3921 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Biomechatronics is the application of mechatronic engineering to human biology and as such it forms an important subset of the overall biomedical engineering discipline. It involves the following: Active and passive prosthetic limbs and joints; Active implants; Bio interfaces for diagnostics and control; Sensing & biofeedback; Bio electrical signal processing; Haptic devices; Tele surgery; Robot based surgery; Medical imaging; Mobility aids, rehabilitation devices & home care, and care of aged; The future.

AMME4971 Tissue Engineering


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and 2 hrs of tutorials per week. Prerequisites: 6cp of junior biology; 6cp of junior chemistry; and 6 cp of intermediate pysiology or equivalent. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

With the severe worldwide shortage of donor organs and the ubiquitous problem of donor organ rejection, there is a strong need for developing technologies for engineering replacement organs and other body parts. Recent developments in biochemistry and cell biology have begun to make this possible, and as a consequence, the very new field of tissue engineering has been making dramatic progress in the last few years. This UoS will provide an introduction to the principles of tissue engineering, as well as an up to date overview of recent progress in the field of tissue engineering is and where it is going. This UoS assumes prior knowledge of cell biology and chemistry and builds on that foundation to elaborate on the important aspects of tissue engineering.
The objectives are:
1. To gain a basic understanding of the major areas of interest in tissue engineering
2. To learn to apply basic engineering principles to tissue engineering systems
3. To understand the challenges and difficulties of tissue engineering.
4. Understand the ethical issues of stem cell applications.
5. Practical classes in the preparation and evaluation of scaffolds for tissue regeneration.
6. Enable student to access web-based resources in tissue engineering (for example: Harvard-MIT Principles and Practice of Tissue Engineering).
7. Research basic skills in Tissue Engineering.

AMME4981 Applied Biomedical Engineering


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hour workgroup sessions per week Assumed knowledge: MECH2901, AMME2301, AMME2500, MECH3921 and MECH3362 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Computer simulation is a very important aspect of engineering in general, and biomedical engineering specifically. This is because it overcomes the problems of clinical, ethical, and design considerations involved in testing early prototypes on live subjects. This unit of study will take a project-based-learning approach to the topic of computer simulation and design optimization of biomedical devices through lectures and facilitated design work and group seminars. The primary focus will be on finite element modeling, and biomedical implantable devices. After some weeks of lectures on these topics, students will form into teams and use computer simulation techniques to develop and optimize their design. Projects are to be conducted in collaboration with companies in the biomedical industry, and it is anticipated that students will spend a significant amount of time with their host company. It is anticipated that students will gain detailed knowledge not only in the design topic assigned to them, but also in the topics assigned to their peers.

AMME4990 Biomedical Product Development


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week Prerequisites: 6 credit points of junior biology 6 credit points of junior chemistry MECH2901 or 6 credit points of intermediate physiology or equivalent MECH3921 Assumed knowledge: Junior level chemistry, intermediate level biology, and specific knowledge of cell biology at least at the junior level, and preferably at the intermediate level. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Product development in the biomedical area presents unique challenges that need to be addressed to efficiently satisfy strict regulatory requirements and to successfully advance products to approval for marketing. Biomedical engineers need a broad understanding of these challenges as the main components of product development are complex and interdependent. Development of good manufacturing and quality control processes, preclinical and clinical validation of product safety and efficacy, and regulatory filings, are each progressive and interdependent processes. This UoS will provide a broad understanding of regulatory requirements for biomedical product development, with particular emphasis on the dependence of each component on the development of processes and control systems that conform to Good Manufacturing Practice. This UoS assumes prior knowledge of cell biology and chemistry and builds on that foundation to elaborate on the important aspects of biomedical product development.

AMME4992 Regulatory Affairs in Medical Industry


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hour weekly lecture Prerequisites: 6 credit points of junior biology 6 credit points of junior chemistry MECH2901 or 6 credit points of intermediate physiology or equivalent MECH3921 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Supply of medical devices, diagnostics and related therapeutic products is regulated in most jurisdictions, with sophisticated and complex regulatory regimes in all large economies. These regulations are applied both to manufacturers and designers and to biomedical engineers undertaking device custom manufacture or maintenance in clinical environments. This UoS will explore the different regulatory frameworks in the "Global Harmonisation Task Force" group of jurisdictions (US, EU, Canada, Japan, Australia) as well as emerging regulatory practices in Asia and South America. Emphasis will be on the commonality of the underlying technical standards and the importance of sophisticated risk management approaches to compliance.

MECH1400 Mechanical Construction


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 hour of lectures and 3 hours of workshop practice per week. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Learn about selected historical events, research methods, analysis techniques, application of theory and analysis to real machinery, use of machine and hand tools. This is a project based subject where the students will build their own designs. Historical developments in the area of the project selected. Research into the necessary fields to fully understand and analyse the project. Review and improve workshop skills. Student designs their own version of the project. Build the project in the workshop. Test the completed machine. The unit ties in with workshop component of MECH1560. Skills developed become relevant in MECH2400 Mechanical Design 1

MECH1560 Introduction to Mechanical Engineering


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: (1hr lec, 2hrs tut, 3hrs workshop) per week Prohibitions: AERO1560, MTRX1701, ENGG1800 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Objectives:
a) To develop an understanding of the role of Mechanical Engineers.
b) To understand the content of the degree structure and how the subjects are applied.
c) To develop an understanding of a range of machining and manufacturing processes required to make mechanical components.
Introductory Mechanical Engineering (50%): Subject introduces the Mechanical Engineering degrees. An overview of the range of roles of a Mechanical Engineer (people, case studies, guests, etc.). The skills/knowledge required of an engineer and the relationship between the subjects in the degree program and how they are applied by practicing engineers. Fundamentals of machinery and equipment common to this degree, with some introductory analysis techniques and problem solving methods.
Manufacturing Technology (50%): Safety requirements: All students are required to comply with the safety regulations. Students who fail to do this will not be permitted to enter the workshops. In particular, approved industrial footwear must be worn, and long hair must be protected by a hair net. Safety glasses must be worn at all times. Workshop Technology practical work in: (a) Fitting . Measurement, marking, hammers, cutting, tapping and screwing, reaming and scraping. (b)Machining . lathe, mill, grinder, drill, shaper, and finishing operations. (c)Welding . Practical work in gas and electric welding. (d)Blacksmithing and forging. (e) Foundary . moulding and casting.

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