Was Ww1 Avoidable Essays

...Justina Saed Mr. Caldron 4/8/13 Per.7 WorldWar I WorldWar I was a destructive and horrible war. It lasted from 1914 to 1918. The causes of WWI were alliances, militarism, and imperialism. What do you think was the underlying cause of WWI? The idea of the term underlying simply means the main idea. Also, the definition of the word cause in this case meant the reasons WWI began. The three causes of WWI were alliances, militarism, and imperialism, however the main cause was imperialism. One of the 3 causes of WWI was alliances. Bismarck created alliances with Austria-Hungary, Germany and Italy, known as central powers. In response, France, Russia, and Great Britain formed their own entente, known as allied powers. The map in document A shows the European alliances in 1914, which was the year when the war began. Though, what it doesn’t show is that in 1915, Italy switched over to allied powers while Bulgaria and the Ottoman Empire was added onto the central powers. The news cartoon, “The Crime of the Ages” in Document B shows all the countries involved with WWI pointing fingers at each other, except for Italy because Italy was just dragged into this. Without Italy the central powers would be surrounded with all enemies. They are all trying to figure out who it is to blame for the...

Was World War 1 Inevitable? Essay

The First World War has established an unforgettable memoir in the history books. World War 1 was a massacre of human life and an important event that determined the present state of the modern world. Yes, World War 1 was inevitable. The foundation of the causes of World War 1 can be traced back to several factors that were building up international tension to the ultimate result of war. In the 1900s, the European countries were extremely competitive in extending their influence around the world. Their competitive nature was motivated by the encouragement of nationalism within countries, the entangled alliances between nations, the arms race and the battle to acquire colonies around the world contributed to the small disputes that exploded to the conclusion of World War 1 with the assassination of Austro-Hungarian heir, Franz Ferdinand.

Firstly, nationalism was a chief contributor to promoting competition between the European countries. In the 1900s, the European countries were experiencing a period of massive industrialization which created a surplus of goods and weapons. As a result, foreign markets had to be dominated to sell goods and to ensure the nation's prosperity. The leaders of Europe instilled patriotic feelings in their citizens and were spreading a belief that their country's superiority made them destined for greatness. The need to control foreign markets provoked a competition for territory which caused further patriotism among the nations in Europe that evolved into a fear and suspicion of other countries. This patriotic attitude was negatively impacting the relationships among the people living in Europe such as in the multinational Austria-Hungary where there were conflicts between different cultural groups due to the desire to be independent from Austro-Hungarian rule. Additionally, the Serbians living in Bosnia murdered Franz Ferdinand because they wanted to be free of Austro-Hungarian rule and return to previous Serbian rule as they felt their loyalty was to only Serbia. Austria-Hungary acted on its irrational nationalistic behaviour when it declared war on Serbia for its involvement in the assassination of their heir, even though there was no solid proof of Serbia's involvement in the crime. Furthermore, the independent nations in Europe were craving more power which put them in a constant battle to prove their superiority to the other countries. This issue was present in many ways in World War 1 such as when Germany was building up their army as a way of increasing their prestige, the French wanting to gain back their two lost provinces from Germany through military means and the Russians wanting another chance to redeem their national honour that had been lost through another war. The nations of...

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